Khangtsens are house (hostel) sections of the Monastery. Each member monks are affiliated to one Khangtsens in the monastery according to the individual's regional affiliation., ie. which is affiliated to the region of ones origin. And each new comer is placed in a specific Khangtsen according to his place of origin.

This system of Khangtsen or Hostel Division & its representation signifies organization of high quality, which facilitates in maintaining the diverse pupils and especially new comers to live with fellow folks, thus avoiding hardship & inconvenience to individuals in vocal language & other related problems.

This traditional system of maintaining Khangtsen/hostel division is still practiced to this day. Before 1959, at Sera Jey Monastery there were 21 different Khangtsens, each representing specific regions of Tibet. However, since the re-establishment of the Monastery at exile in India, the total no of Khangtsen has been merged to 14 nos.

 

The list of 21 Khamtsen that were existent in Tibet before the 1959.
01. Samlo 08. Gomde 15. Aepa
02. Hardong 09. Lawa 16. Nyalpo
03. Jardel 10. Denma 17. Dhagpo
04. Tehor 11. Ngari 18. Tsethan
05. Drati 12. Tagmo 19. Guge
06. Tsawa 13. Tsangpa 20. Pethung
07. Lhopa 14. Gyaljed 21. Zangskar

 

The present and existing list of 14 Khangtsens
01. Samlo 06. Tsawa 11. Ngari
02. Hardong 07. Lhopa 12. Tsangpa
03. Jadrel 08. Gomde 13. Dhagpo
04. Tehor 09. Lawa 14. Tsethan
05. Drati 10. Denma  

Ganden Tri Pa

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    Lhundup Tsundue 

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    Jedrung Thupten Kunga 

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Jangtse Choeje

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    Lobsang Tenzin 

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    Lobsang Tenzin 

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Former Abbots

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    61st Khensur Ngawang Gyatso 

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    64th Khensur Lhundup Thapkhe 

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    65th Khensur Lobsang Wangchuk 

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    66th Khensur Lobsang Dhonyoe 

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    67th Khensur Dhondup Topgyal 

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    Khensur In Tibet Lobsang Sherab 

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    68th Khensur Ngawang Legden 

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    69th Khensur Lobsang Thupten 

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    70th Khensur Lobsang Tsering 

    His Eminence Geshe Lobsang Tsering, the 70th abbot of Sera Jey Monastery, was born in Tibet in 1923. He was ordained at the age of five and started his Buddhist philosophical studies at twelve. At the age of seventeen, he joined Sera Jey Monastery and underwent rigorous philosophical studies. He served as a philosophy teacher at his native monastery for three years. In 1959 he was imprisoned by Chinese authorities for seven years and had to undergo extreme hardship. In 1969, he fled Tibet under immense hardship, to India for exile.  At Sera Jey Monastery in South India, he earned the first position in his Geshe Lharampa Examination in 1978.  In 1986, he was enthroned the 70th abbot of Sera Jey Monastery and made several developments in both spiritual and administrative fields. He devoted his entire life to teaching the Buddhist philosophy to scores of aspiring students.

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    71st Khensur Jampa Theckchok 

    His Eminence Jampa Thekchok, the 71st abbot of Sera jey Monastery was born in Phenpo, Tibet in 1930. He was ordained at the age of eight and began his study of major Buddhist texts around the age of ten. His eminence arrived in exile in 1959 and continued his studies in major Buddhist texts. He taught Buddhist studies at Central University of Tibetan Studies, Sarnath, for seven years and travelled aboard to give teachings. In 1993, he was enthroned as the abbot of Sera Jey Monastery and he served the monastery in great length in both spiritual and administrative fields.

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    72nd Khensur Lobsang Dhonyoe 

    His Eminence Jetsun Lobsang Donyo, the 72nd abbot of Sera Jey monastery, was born in 1925. At the age of nine, he joined Lhatse monastery, gained basic Tibetan education and memorized all traditional monastic scriptures and studied basic Buddhist epistemology. At the age of nineteen, he joined Sera Jey Monastic University and studied all major Buddhist texts.

    In 1961, he left Tibet to take exile in India and continued his study at Buxar in north India. He has served as proof-reader at monastery’s printing office. In 1967, he studied at Central University for Tibetan studies, Sarnath and received the Acharya degree.
    In 1999, he was enthroned the 72nd abbot of Sera Jey Monastery and made great contribution to both spiritual and temporal affairs.

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    73rd Khensur Lobsang Palden 

    His eminence Jetsun Lobsang Palden, the 73rd abbot of Sera Jey Monastic University, was born in 1936. At the age of twelve, he joined Dhargye Monastic School and memorized all traditional monastic scriptures as well as studied basic Buddhist epistemology and other texts.

    At the age of seventeen, he joined Sera Jey Monastery and studied all major Buddhist texts. In 1959, he fled to India and continued his studies at Buxar in north India. In 1965, he studied at Central University for Tibetan studies, Varanasi, and received the Acharya degree.
    In 2005, he was enthroned as the 73rd abbot of Sera Jey Monastic University and made great contribution to both spiritual and administrative fields. Moreover, he devoted most of his time to give teachings and oral transmissions on Buddhist scriptural resources to scores of pupil monks.

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    74th Khensur Lobsang Delek 

    His Eminence Jetsun Lobsang Delek, the 74th abbot of Sera Jey Monastery, was born in 1939 at Karze district in Tibet. At the age of seven, he joined Karze Monastery and started memorizing traditional monastic scriptures. His given name is Lobsang Delek and received ordained name as Ngawang Soepa while he was newly ordained at age of seventeen. In 1959, he fled to India and continued his Buddhist philosophical studies at Buxar in north India. In 1968, he received the full-ordained vows from His Holiness the Dalai Lama. In 1982, he was honored with first position of Lharam Geshe degree. Moreover, in 2005, he was enthroned as the abbot of Gudme Tantric Monastery, and he became the 75th Sera Jey Abbot on 6 May 2012. Generally, he devotes his precious regular time in giving teaching and conferring different initiations and oral transmissions.

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